Cities - 05/July/2016

Urban landscapes for a wetter future

Heavier cloudbursts, rising sea levels, more flooding. This is the outlook for many urban areas. City councils, architects and engineers are responding to the challenges of a wetter future by looking at ways to adapt the urban landscape rather than expanding traditional underground drainage solutions. The approach saves money and creates better urban spaces.

Picture a corner of a city park developed as an amenity area in the shape of a giant shallow bowl. The bowl is bordered by a low double-wall forming a narrow channel that traces the spiral arch pattern of a snail shell. Clear water runs through the channel and collects at the bottom of the bowl. Here it seeps into shallow drainage holes to be pumped up in fountains close by. ...

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