Jason Deign Technology - 18/March/2022

Pretty in pink: Low-carbon hydrogen from nuclear power

The nuclear sector wants to cash in on the emerging demand for low-carbon energy by powering hydrogen electrolysis, but not everyone is convinced the industry’s arguments stack up

A hydrogen economy will need vast amounts of low-carbon electricity to power electrolysis, possibly offering nuclear power renewed opportunities in a decarbonised world ...

 

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