Technology - 27/May/2021

On the hunt for low-carbon aluminium

Recycling existing aluminium has significant carbon benefits compared to producing brand new material. However, the limited resources cannot keep up with the growing demand. The industry is looking to reduce carbon intensity while maintaining aluminium’s benefits

Given the long lifetime of products that use the material, recycling rates of aluminium cannot keep pace with the growing demand

HIGH DEMAND Aluminium’s properties make it a popular choice across many manufacturing sectors looking to decarbonise, with demand increasing until mid-century

HIGH CARBON Production of new aluminium is carbon-intensive because it relies heavily on electricity, which is still mainly generated from fossil fuels in many parts of the world

KEY QUOTE I can’t imagine that we could succeed with the green transition without aluminium ...

 

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