Policy - 08/June/2022

Energy efficiency is here to stay

This decade is the most important one for energy efficiency in the energy transition. FORESIGHT spoke to Brian Motherway, head of energy efficiency at the International Energy Agency (IEA), to discuss why this is and how it can be better implemented

Speaking ahead of the IEA’s 7th Annual Global Conference on Energy Efficiency in Sønderborg, Denmark (June 7th-9th), Brian Motherway describes how global collaboration on energy efficiency measures is vital for its success. While there are different contexts for each region, the issues surrounding energy efficiency are similar everywhere, he says.

The past two years, dominated by a pandemic and more recently war, have catapulted energy efficiency to the top of the political agenda, but Motherway believes the threat of global warming was already changing mindsets. While it is a complex puzzle to solve, energy efficiency is uniquely placed to combat the trio of current crises: energy security, climate change and unprecedented price hikes. ...

 

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