Technology

Trump will delay but not destroy an electric car future for America

The United States, the home of the car, has yet to make the kind of market impact with electric vehicles (EVs) as it did with the internal combustion engine

Most read this month

How we reduced our energy bills by 60%

The role of philanthropic foundations in advancing clean energy

Near-term headwinds slow renewables’ march

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We face a fundamental change of the cost structure on the supply side and a need for a fundamental change.

Jochen Kreusel

- Market innovation manager in the power grids division at ABB Power

They [the European Commission] are looking at this stuff backwards. I still think they are convinced the short-term market model could work even though they are also starting to realise that you need something parallel, with long term price signals that give investors confidence to invest in infrastructure and allow them to see a decent market return.

Francesco Venturini

- Global head of renewables for Italian utility Enel

Despite tremendous cost decline of wind and solar technologies, electricity prices will probably remain too low to attract the level of investment needed.

Fatih Birol

- Executive director of the International Energy Agency

The greatest barrier to overcome is the integration of variable renewables into electricity systems. This will require developing power system flexibility and also a friendly deployment of variable renewables.

Fatih Birol

- Executive director of the International Energy Agency

Finance ministers need to coordinate for a resilient economy

The fiscal response to the Covid-19 crisis is an opportunity to establish a green economy but finance ministers across the globe need to coordinate their actions for the biggest impact, says Dileimy Orozco from E3G

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How Covid-19 could supercharge the green bond market

Work on mobilising the global bond market to finance the low carbon transition has received an unexpected boost at the hands of the Covid-19 pandemic. Green bond issues are vastly oversubscribed as investors show a clear preference for putting their money into shifting society in a new and better direction

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Near-term headwinds slow renewables’ march

The renewable energy sector cannot escape the impact of Covid-19, but a redrawing of the landscape and its resilience through the pandemic will lay the foundations for future growth, says Arnaud de Giovanni, Global Power and Utilities Transaction Advisory Services leader at EY

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The role of philanthropic foundations in advancing clean energy

A big part of speeding up the move away from fossil fuels is scaling up innovation and technology. With an appetite for riskier projects, philanthropic foundations could play an important role in raising some much needed cash

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Pay attention to young voices and quit wasting our future money

The 2050 targets are closer than you think. The impacts of today’s decisions will directly affect the young people already in the workforce. Monika Skadborg, chairperson of the Danish Youth Climate Council, argues it is time those voices should be heard in the climate debate

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How we reduced our energy bills by 60%

A year of living with a heat pump has required some lifestyle changes, but after doing some number crunching, Jan Rosenow from the Regulatory Assistance Project found the numbers speak for themselves

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A pale green bond for the energy transition

The concept of transition bonds began as an idea to sell bonds that were difficult to market as green bonds, mainly natural gas bonds, but has evolved into an opportunity to accelerate decarbonisation efforts

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Central banks swept up in climate action debate

Many believe the ECB and other central banks should bring climate considerations into the rulebook governing what they support and how

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Opinion

Ocean energy is critical to recovery

Offshore wind attracts investment, jobs and has the ability to severely cut emissions worldwide, which is why the world should aim for 1,400 GW of capacity by 2050, argue Benj Sykes and Stephen Bull, Co-Chairs of Ocean Renewable Energy Action Coalition (OREAC), a global coalition of offshore wind companies and international institutions on World Oceans Day (June 8)

Danish firms want regulatory rewards for climate action

Development banks struggle with fossil fuel lock-in

Why clean hydrogen can be part of the just transition

Staying committed to renewables makes investment sense

The dirty British energy secret

China: the elephant in the coal room

Finance dries up for coal, but flows on for oil and gas

Responding to the growing demand for methane-differentiated gas

Transition to just

Making the EU ETS and carbon pricing fit-for-purpose

Reducing emissions while creating jobs

What our editors are reading

A sustainable energy recovery could boost global economies by 1.1% yearly

Reports

Investment of some about $1 trillion annually over the next three years, equal to about 0.7% of today’s global GDP, would boost jobs in areas such as in retrofitting buildings, improving energy efficiency, and in the electricity sector, particularly in grids and renewables. Measures detailed in the IEA analysis on sustainable recovery, conducted with the IMF, could accelerate the deployment of low-carbon electricity sources like new wind and solar, and expand and modernise electricity grids.

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Offshore wind offers significant job potential for Denmark

Reports

One gigawatt of offshore wind capacity in Denmark creates 14,600 man-years of employment, a new report by Danish Shipping, Dansk Energi and Wind Denmark finds. A project, like the proposed Thor site, secures 4900 man-years in direct work, with a further 9600 man-years created indirectly. Denmark’s dominant position in the sector also means for every 1 GW of capacity installed in Europe, 1400 man-hours are created for Danish seafarers offering a huge potential for firms as Europe targets 450 GW of capacity by 2050.

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Global EV sales remain strong despite Covid-19

Reports

The number of electric cars on the road globally should near ten million this year, as sales continue despite the Covid-19 pandemic, says a new report by International Energy Agency. Electric vehicle sales this year are expected to match the 2.1 million sold in 2019, a record 2.6% of the total global car sales. Total worldwide sales of all passenger cars are expected to decline this year by 15%. The IEA warns that a second wave of the pandemic and a slower-than-expected economic recovery could affect the sales of EV and vehicles with internal combustion engines.

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