Policy Dispatch Podcast, Sam Morgan

Africa’s climate transition

This week, Policy Dispatch takes a look into Africa’s energy transition, the main hurdles that the continent’s 54 nations are facing, and its untapped renewable potential with Saliem Fakir, Executive Director at the African Climate Foundation

Most read this month

Technology and incentives: How to reduce heavy-truck emissions quickly

Shipping on a voyage to low-carbon fuel options

Chemicals’ complex route to green

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We face a fundamental change of the cost structure on the supply side and a need for a fundamental change.

Jochen Kreusel

- Market innovation manager in the power grids division at ABB Power

They [the European Commission] are looking at this stuff backwards. I still think they are convinced the short-term market model could work even though they are also starting to realise that you need something parallel, with long term price signals that give investors confidence to invest in infrastructure and allow them to see a decent market return.

Francesco Venturini

- Global head of renewables for Italian utility Enel

Despite tremendous cost decline of wind and solar technologies, electricity prices will probably remain too low to attract the level of investment needed.

Fatih Birol

- Executive director of the International Energy Agency

The greatest barrier to overcome is the integration of variable renewables into electricity systems. This will require developing power system flexibility and also a friendly deployment of variable renewables.

Fatih Birol

- Executive director of the International Energy Agency

Bioenergy under renewed scrutiny amid energy crisis

Burning wood for energy is a divisive matter. Critics say that it is an unacceptably polluting energy source, while proponents insist it is a vital part of the transition away from fossil fuels. Upcoming policy changes and unpredictable geopolitics make a complex issue thornier still

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What voluntary carbon markets need to do next

A large, mature voluntary carbon market is urgently needed. To get there, it has some growing up to do, says Charlie Langdale, from international insurance broker Howden

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An attractive profession

Europe has set ambitious objectives in its energy transition, but the continent risks not having the workforce to make it happen

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Biodiversity measures to fast-track renewables deployment

Protecting the natural environment is central to combating catastrophic climate change. But the scale of growth in renewables capacity puts biodiversity at risk. Developers and investors alike are now placing great emphasis on the environmental footprint of their assets

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To keep growing, the offshore wind industry needs a digital edge

Owners and operators of offshore wind projects need to rapidly accelerate their adoption of digitalisation to head off the impact of soaring costs and supply chain challenges, says Evgenia Golysheva at ONYX Insight

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Decarbonising our buildings

In this first episode of Policy Dispatch, we take a deep dive into buildings and the need to accelerate their decarbonisation, with Member of the European Parliament Ciarán Cuffe

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The dawn of the second-hand market for batteries

As the first generation of EVs begins to reach the end of its operational life, the car market is examining what to do with the batteries held within. With the demand for batteries set to increase in transport and other sectors, experts are examining how recycling and reusing old batteries can continue to support the energy transition

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Decarbonisation through digitalisation: The key role of smart city districts in boosting energy efficiency

Smart buildings are energy-saving, sustainable buildings. Clustered into smart city districts, they play a crucial role in climate protection. The adaptive, open-source technology to make this possible is already available, says Matthias Rebellius of Siemens Smart Infrastructure

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Policy Dispatch Podcast, Sam Morgan

Introducing: Policy Dispatch

Listen to the trailer for the new podcast Policy Dispatch from FORESIGHT Climate & Energy, delving into the key policy and regulation that underpins the global energy transition

A strategy for carbon capture technologies

Lithium supply challenges reinforce the hunt for storage alternatives

Clean power by 2035 is crucial for Europe’s climate and energy security

Technology and incentives: How to reduce heavy-truck emissions quickly

The energy transition needs a new definition of pretty

From forecast to reality

Shipping on a voyage to low-carbon fuel options

Today’s approach to energy is unsustainable

Inertia’s new frontier

High energy prices and momentum to transition demand new grid capacity and fast

The need for climate finance Jedi

What our editors are reading

Renewables extend price dominance over fossil fuels

Reports

The cost of solar has been halved, while wind costs have also fallen by almost one-third, according to McKinsey. This is due to rapid technological developments and supply chain optimisation. As a result, 61% of new renewable capacity installation is currently priced lower than fossil fuel alternatives. Renewables will become the new baseload generation and will account for 50% of the power mix by 2030 and 85% by 2050 as build-out rates for solar and wind grow by a factor of five and eight respectively. Global fossil fuel demand will peak between 2023 and 2025, it says. 

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The cost of inaction

Reports

Climate change, left unchecked, could cost the global economy $178 trillion by 2070, says Deloitte. But if a net-zero emission economy is achieved by 2050, the world could instead see a $43 trillion economic boost by 2070. Deloitte surveyed 23 countries and found that nearly half of them had experienced a climate-related event in the previous six months. Meanwhile, 89% of C-Level executives surveyed agreed there is a “global climate emergency” while 79% see the world is at a tipping point. 

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Hydrogen facing transport woes

Reports

One of the most efficient ways to transport hydrogen appears to be blending it with natural gas in existing pipelines. But there are lots of reasons why this is an unsuitable solution. Due to a different molecular weight, an 80% natural gas-20% hydrogen blend would only achieve at most a 7% reduction in carbon dioxide emissions, according to IRENA. Because hydrogen is more expensive, such a blend would also cost gas consumers more. Additionally, it is expensive to separate hydrogen from fossil gas for other uses; gas consumption fluctuates seasonally whereas hydrogen demand does not; while blending technology remains immature. 

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